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Hey i am a beginer to improv. When i try doing a improv it always comes out so bluesy if anyone knows what i am saying. I am trying to play more of a rock improv, and im having such a hard time getting it to sound that way. Can someone give point me in the direction of some help or offer some advice. i am just playing basic scales i guess. Sorry for the ignorance but im just starting out

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Hello there,

Are you using the pentatonic scale? That usually makes it sound bluesy. If you wanna break out of that type of sound, try experimenting with the major scale shapes. Since all the notes are there, you have to be pickier with your note selection.

I suggest you work on the melody when you solo. I'd also suggest you try working on 3,4,6 note groups on both the pentatonic and major shapes using a metronome (start at the slowest speed you can play clean and increase by 1 click every day). Also try stringing scales together since you don't really have a lot of range by just staying on one scale in the same position.

But again, being able to play all those notes is useless if you don't have a main melody or theme - your audience has to feel that you're going somewhere with your solo, that there's a point. You have to communicate your idea and emotion through your playing. I don't know how else to describe it but that's how it should be. But as always, see what works for you.

Hope this helps. Good luck!

lorsban

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yea i am working with the penatonic scale since that was where i was told to start off. When you say major scale shapes do you mean i.e being able to play all notes in the key of G besides F (playing a F sharp instead) and thanks for the response

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yea i am working with the penatonic scale since that was where i was told to start off. When you say major scale shapes do you mean i.e being able to play all notes in the key of G besides F (playing a F sharp instead) and thanks for the response

Yes, that's what I'm talking about. But not just being able to play all the notes but choosing the right ones within the scale itself so it suits the song you're playing over.

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im sorry what are b3 and b7's

Welcome Brc,

He is referring to the flat 3 and flat 7 of the scale you are using, I believe.

Nutty

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The blue note can be thought of as an 'extra' note.

The G blues scale is (starting in the 6th string, 3rd fret):

G - A# -

C - C# (blue note) - D -

F - G -

A# - C - C# (blue note)

D - F

G - A#

Or, in tab:

-------------------------3-6--

---------------------3-6------

---------------3-5-6----------

-----------3-5----------------

-----3-4-5--------------------

-3-6--------------------------

Nice thing about this shape is that you can repeat it in all the neck, getting that notes blues scale. Start at 12th fret? E blues scale!

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im sorry what are b3 and b7's

A great site to pick up some of the basic theory (with an application to guitar on page 5 of 6) is here:

Guitar Music Theory | Guitar Chords

It's worth taking 30 minutes to follow the tutorial and write down all the chord forms. Once you know the chord forms you can construct chords at will (or - in my case ... at will and very slowly).

Regards.

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Each note in the Major scale has a number associated with it....

The first note is number 1, second no.2 etc. When we play outside chords... i.e. chords that are outside the standard chords in the major scale... we then start seeing the 3b and 7b etc. notes mentioned. 3b would depict a minor chord and a 7b would denote a seventh...

hhhmmm.... where was I going with this?

any further, more guided questions would get you better answers. i think...

I hope the explanation above helps to shed some light at least.

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