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rnr

electric help please

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Is there an electric that is easier to play and learn on than others? I was in a GC and trying the feel of several types. To me the Squier's neck seemed really narrow near the nut. Compared to my Ibanez acoustic electric anyway.Is a narrow nut helpful for a first electric? Also does a 25.5 scale compared to a 24.75 easier for a beginner? I ask because I have read some reviews of a Squier Tele Jag with a 24" scale being really easy to play? I really like to sound of a Les Paul however for a first electric I want the best for learning on. Or does scale and nut width make any difference for a first electric beginner?

Thanks for any help !!

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Personal opinion on this one....

neck width, you probably would want to try and find one that is close in width to your acoustic, just for familiarity and comfort. Just my opinion on that.

As for the scale length. My understanding, and from what I feel in playing, is with the longer length, 25.5 in. there is more string tension needed to get the strings to pitch. With a shorter length, 24.75, there is less tension needed. I can feel the difference between my Strat, that has the longer length, versus my Dean that has the shorter length. It feels easier to play the Dean, easier on bends, also. But , I've been wrong before, so.......

As to whether the scale length and nut width ,make a diff to the beginner...depends on the beginner. If it is that persons first guitar, period, then that is what they would get used to. It also depends on the size of the hand and fingers. Some folks with big hands may feel a bit cramped with a narrow neck. Others may not mind it. Some folks with small hands may have a bit of a problem reaching the strings for chords on a wide neck.

For the width issue, I would suggest you go with whatever you feel most comfortable with.

For the scale length, the difference is not only with playing but will also have some effect on the tones from the guitar.

If you like the tones from a Les Paul, look into the Epiphone line of Les Pauls (unless money is no object!!) and try several different ones since the Epiphones can vary in how they are made. Or, if Samick is an available option, they make nice guitars, good quality (that I've seen) and shorter scale length on their Les Paul type guitars. Decent pricing, too.

Hope that helps!

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+1 on Andy's advice. I have ahd for or five Samicks, all elec & acoustic all with very nice slim necks. One other thing to think about is the neck radius...larger radii, 12" or so, are flatter and easied to chord, Strat like 7-9" are great for leads.

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...larger radii, 12" or so, are flatter and easied to chord, Strat like 7-9" are great for leads.

I find it just the opposite - to me, a smaller radius seems easier to chord because it has the effect of making the neck narrower, and flatter necks are better for leads because you don't have as much chance of "fretting out" on bends. I find barre chords easier on smaller radius necks because you don't have to force your barring finger so flat....it just feels like it more naturally matches the curvature of the finger.

To be completely honest, I don't find any particular guitar or neck "harder" to learn or play on, per se. When I started playing again a couple of years ago, I went with a Strat....then I switched to playing mostly Teles. I recently bought a Les Paul, and don't really notice much difference. I was fooling around yesterday and played my Strat, two of my Teles (with different neck radii and profiles), the LP, a Gretsch and a Schecter....all very different guitars, with different bodies, scale lengths and necks, but none of them stood out to me as being easier or harder to play, and it wasn't difficult to transition between them.

I think you were on the right track by going into GC and playing different guitars. What feels right for others won't necessarily feel right for you, and vice-versa. My advice would be to buy the one that you like best and feel most comfortable with, as Andy said.

Edit: I'll also echo Andy's advice about looking at the Epiphones. The one I just bought is an Epi' Les Paul Standard with a flamed maple top, and I'm quite pleased with it.

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I find it just the opposite - to me, a smaller radius seems easier to chord because it has the effect of making the neck narrower, and flatter necks are better for leads because you don't have as much chance of "fretting out" on bends. I find barre chords easier on smaller radius necks because you don't have to force your barring finger so flat....it just feels like it more naturally matches the curvature of the finger.

To be completely honest, I don't find any particular guitar or neck "harder" to learn or play on, per se. When I started playing again a couple of years ago, I went with a Strat....then I switched to playing mostly Teles. I recently bought a Les Paul, and don't really notice much difference. I was fooling around yesterday and played my Strat, two of my Teles (with different neck radii and profiles), the LP, a Gretsch and a Schecter....all very different guitars, with different bodies, scale lengths and necks, but none of them stood out to me as being easier or harder to play, and it wasn't difficult to transition between them.

I think you were on the right track by going into GC and playing different guitars. What feels right for others won't necessarily feel right for you, and vice-versa. My advice would be to buy the one that you like best and feel most comfortable with, as Andy said.

Edit: I'll also echo Andy's advice about looking at the Epiphones. The one I just bought is an Epi' Les Paul Standard with a flamed maple top, and I'm quite pleased with it.

Hello Stratrat...

I am no expert to give my opinion,but I think that this matter is very delicate and objective.It depends on how different persons respond to different things.Some guitarists say that a narrower neck is better for solos as you don't have to cover so much distance from one string to another.The barre chords are more comfortable and it just takes practice in order to get used to the narrower neck and play anything you like.I think that you don't feel any difference in playing when you try out your guitars because you are experienced enough to play almost anything with strings on it :winkthumb: .

+1 to Andy S for saying that rnr should use an electric with width close to his acoustic...

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Ditto on all of the above. I have a very inexpensive Epiphone SG Special and love it. I had to try out 15 different ones to find it but it was well worth the effort. I also tried a real Gibson SG and as far as playability, I really couldn't feel a difference between it, and the Epiphone I bought.

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Out of all the guitars I've tried (but not owned) my favorite would be those with "compound radius". I've only seen it on Jacksons though so far. But with that you get the best of both worlds basically.

Its all personal preferce other than that. Those with longer fingers may find that thinner radius feels like a ukelele.

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For the money, some of the best playing guitars I've had were from Ibanez. Their necks feel awesome in my opinion.

But more important than the manufacturer is probably the setup. If the neck is bowed and the action is high, any good guitar can be a pain to play. So, if you know how or if you know somebody who can do it for you, have your guitar set up properly. You won't regret it.

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For the money, some of the best playing guitars I've had were from Ibanez. Their necks feel awesome in my opinion.

But more important than the manufacturer is probably the setup. If the neck is bowed and the action is high, any good guitar can be a pain to play. So, if you know how or if you know somebody who can do it for you, have your guitar set up properly. You won't regret it.

Are you talking about the wizard II neck? If so, I have it on my S470DX and my RG. Its pretty good, but I still prefer compound radius. Oh ya even a thousand dollar guitar can really suck to play if its not setup properly. And I heard that even a cheapo starter pack guitar can play quite good when setup properly too.

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Are you talking about the wizard II neck?

All of them. Ibanez generally have high quality necks. I did get one dud though with an SZ 320 which has a raised tongue. My SZ4020 Prestige, SA120, RG470 all have awesome necks. The Prestige of course is in a whole other league. I'd choose it over any Baker, PRS, Gibson or what have you in terms of neck/fretboard finish, feel and overall quality.

The only thing that comes close is my Epi Elite LP custom from Japan as well. Only trouble was that it came with small frets - akin to the original LP's from the 50's (the LP was originally regarded as the "fretless wonder" for this reason). Eventually, I replaced the frets to larger ones and it's much better now.

Generally though, I prefer a flatter radius.

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