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solidwalnut

New Lesson: Learn to Play Any Song

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I just finished a new lesson/article on how to put a few raw skills together so a person can begin to learn how to listen and play any song they wish. It's an overview of the building blocks. Hopefully helpful. I hope you enjoy!

Learn to Play Any Song

Steve

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Steve,

I looked at this again and compared it to the music building and have a much better understanding to what is going on now.

Thank you for your lessons here.

eddie

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Thanks much for the post. I always look forward to your insight. I especially like the parts about ear training.

John

Thanks John! I hope you find it helpful.

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Steve,

I looked at this again and compared it to the music building and have a much better understanding to what is going on now.

Thank you for your lessons here.

eddie

Thanks Eddie! That's the plan; to try and tie it all together.

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Steve,

I am having difficulty in the (vii) chords. Would it be possible to display the chords? Its (b5) th is what I am having trouble with.

Does this mean

Cm7b5 =Cm7 and d flat?

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Hi Eddie!

The m7b5 (or half-diminished chord) is that which is built from the seventh degree of the tonic scale. So, in C, Bm7b5, consists of B; D (the b3rd); F (the b5th) and A (the b7th) which is a chord synonym for Dm6. So your Cm7b5, which is the seventh degree of Db, will consist of C, Eb, Gb and Bb, which is a chord synonym for Ebm6.

Hope this helps!

All the best,

Nick.

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Steve,

I am having difficulty in the (vii) chords. Would it be possible to display the chords? Its (b5) th is what I am having trouble with.

Does this mean

Cm7b5 =Cm7 and d flat?

Eddie--

Here's an excerpt from the lesson The Major Scale Chart: Part 1. I encourage you to check into this lesson and parts 2, 3 and 4.

**********

There are two basic shapes to play this on the neck:

........x2323x... and ...xx4555

Bm7b5.gifFsharpm7b5.gif

The easiest way to find them is this: look for the E and A strings for anchors. When you've found the 7th degree scale note (B, in the key of C for example) that is where the chord form begins on the A string (the x2323x form). For the xx4555 form, find the 7th degree scale note (F#, in the key of G for example) on the E string. Then play that same note one octave higher on the D string. This is where the formation begins.

************

So you can look at this from the perspective of theory and notes, and you can look at this from the perspective of finding shapes. These shapes are just another example of moveable chord formations.

Also, remember that this chord form is the perfect chord for presenting the perfect harmonization in the 'chord-scale'. If you want, you can always substitute the V7 chord (in the key of C, that would be the G7 chord) for the vii chord. As a matter of fact, try both so you can hear the differences.

Steve

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knecht,

Thank you for your explanation.

Steve,

Thanks for taking the time for the the explanation also.

Ok, I tried em, I here the difference. Not the most pleasant sounding

is it?

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Thanks very much, knight.

Eddie, I guess what I mean is to hear the differences as far as using each one as a substitute in a series of chords. Play C, Dm, Em, F, G, Am, Bm7b5, C. Now substitute a G7 for the Bm7b5 in that same run, and hear how the G7 is a great alternate chord.

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Steve,

Does this apply to all vii going down the list? Because all that are listed in the chart are definitely terrible.

I mean the pattern.

Unless your some Jazz player.

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Steve,

Does this apply to all vii going down the list? Because all that are listed in the chart are definitely terrible.

I mean the pattern.

Unless your some Jazz player.

Sure. That's the beauty of the roman numeral system. The intervals between the notes / chords remains the same. Only the names change.

So it doesn't matter what key you're playing in. A chord progression that is a ii vi I IV will sound the same. Only the names of the notes / chords and the pitch will be different.

So if the progression is a ii vi I vii I, the chord names in the key of C are a Dm, Am, C, Bm7b5, C. Outside any of the 'rules', we can use the V7 chord, the G7, for the Bm7b5, the vii chord. It will sound a bit different, but it will work.

If you play that same progression (ii vi I vii I) in the key of D, what are you chord names? If you substitute the V7 for the vii chord, what is the name of that chord?

Yes, the vii chord is more of a jazzy chord. But it's a good one to have in your arsenal. Plus, remember that the m7b5 chord is the 'true' chord when harmonizing the major scale (don't concern yourself with that part yet. Just get the whole idea of the roman numeral system being a sliding scale with the chord shapes and names).

Steve

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Steve,

I assume that that goes all the way down the list.

Meaning the V becomes a 7th.

Key of E = B7

Key of F = C7 and so on down the line.

I wont ask why all the crazy one's on the vii :)

Now I can go back to the music building and make the most sense of it.

I guess I just needed the Letters or Number to see the picture.

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Steve,

I assume that that goes all the way down the list.

Meaning the V becomes a 7th.

Key of E = B7

Key of F = C7 and so on down the line.

I wont ask why all the crazy one's on the vii :)

Now I can go back to the music building and make the most sense of it.

I guess I just needed the Letters or Number to see the picture.

Yep. You got it. I always need anchors like letter or numbers or some picture in order to get it.

Maybe ask about the crazy vii's sometime when you get that far?

Steve

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