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omega3697

Ensenada Acoustic Guitar

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omega3697    0

I inherited a guitar from my grandfather who passed about 15 years ago. I've been trying to find out the origin of the guitar with no luck. It's an Ensenada acoustic, but I'm thinking it's not made by Fender since I can't find one comparable anywhere. I'm thinking he bought it some time in the 50's or 60's. If anyone knows about this guitar, I'd appreciate any feedback. It plays very well, and I'm honored to have it.

Seams I have to make 5 or more posts before I can post links. I appologize for the 4 additional posts I'm about to make. :)

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I have a 12-string version of the same guitar,except it doen't have a second pickguard.Mine's on the treble side of the soundhole.Action was kinda high when I got it from my grandfather,but I had it lowered.It has the same fretboard inlays,and the logo on mine is in mother of pearl.Don't know much about it,but it sounds pretty!

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Jeffom    0

Omega,

The assumption is that it's a Fender because of the recent line of the Fender 'Ensenada series', a custom made guitar from their plant in Ensenada Mexico. I have an Ensenada 'hummin-bird' copy from the '70's similar to yours, model WG 69. The Ensenada brand of guitars was a Japanese import. It was a private label guitar made by Ibenez, who primarily in the 70's made sever 'take-off' type copies notably of Gibsons popular guitars. They were imported from a Chicago based company called Strum and Drum until around the mid 70's. My father bought the one I have in 1971 and I play it everyday. So there you have it, hope that answers your question.

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markjsr    0

I was unaware of the Ensenada version of this guitar till very recently. I bought my Norma for $69 in the summer of 1970. Mine is NORMA, but I've seen pictures of the Ensenada version and it's nearly identical. Same body with slightly different coloration. Same neck and inlay. Same rosette, similar bridge (with the same screw-driven adjustment mechanism), same headstock with similar trussrod cover. The Norma has a single pickguard, while the Ensenada has a double guard.

The tone is incredibly warm for a cheap guitar. My son is a fiend for guitars and declared that played alongside a real Gibson Hummingbird, the tone on my Norma is as good as the real thing. The sustain is about as good as you will ever hear on an acoustic guitar of any price.

The cool part of the story was that my brother was not living with us at the time, and the same day I brought home my Norma, he came to tell us he had bought a guitar (his was on lay-away) and he bought the identical guitar from the same store on the same day...without either of us talking to the other about it. He was angry at first because he thought they had sold his layaway out from under him. For a while I had custody of both, with one strung on light strings, and the other strung with medium. Wish I still had the twin.

I've heard the quality of these guitars was a bit uneven, but has features you only see on much more expensive guitars. For example, the rosette on most guitars is decal. On this model, it's inlaid. The wood on the body is very tight grain, and on mine appears to be a single piece of wood...though on an Ensenada I saw pictures of, it was bookmatched. Though the back is dark stained, my son pointed out to me that the wood is flamed which is a feature of much more expensive guitars. Marble inlaid rosewood fretboard.

We found pictures of the Ensenada WG-69, but have never been able to find pictures of the WG-69 Norma. My son is a much better guitar player than I and he's convinced this is a much more valuable guitar than would be thought if you only look at its brand and model.

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supafly42    0

Omega,

The assumption is that it's a Fender because of the recent line of the Fender 'Ensenada series', a custom made guitar from their plant in Ensenada Mexico. I have an Ensenada 'hummin-bird' copy from the '70's similar to yours, model WG 69. The Ensenada brand of guitars was a Japanese import. It was a private label guitar made by Ibenez, who primarily in the 70's made sever 'take-off' type copies notably of Gibsons popular guitars. They were imported from a Chicago based company called Strum and Drum until around the mid 70's. My father bought the one I have in 1971 and I play it everyday. So there you have it, hope that answers your question.

My father bought the ensenada that I play today, also in 1971, when he was 14...small world. More important, there appears to be a date inside, stamped inside the body is 71 1 6. The sentimental value is intense, and whats more, I have a Johnson that was gifted to me a few years ago that doesn't sound half as deep and golden as this guitar does. Here's a pic, love my baby. New strings today.

post-104478-054882000 1297374212_thumb.jpg

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