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Chords played up the neck without barres


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#21 carol m

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Posted 25 October 2007 - 10:14 PM

My head is spinning, fingers too......woohoo :)
One good thing about music is that when it hits you, you feel no pain - Bob Marley

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#22 monk

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Posted 26 October 2007 - 12:39 AM

Aadd9

0
0
6
7
0
x


Technically this chord is Aadd2. In order to be considered a 9 there has to be a 7 present.

Regards,
Monk

#23 si16

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Posted 26 October 2007 - 05:30 AM

Technically this chord is Aadd2. In order to be considered a 9 there has to be a 7 present.

Regards,
Monk


I agree, A9 would be A C# E G B. The chord I wrote has a B but no G. My understanding of added chords convention is that the added note is always written an octave up from the root (regardless of whether it actually is or not). Is this incorrect?

#24 monk

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Posted 26 October 2007 - 01:24 PM

si16,
Sorry. I may not have been clear about that.

A9=A C# E G B

Amaj9=A C# E G# B

Aadd2=A C# E B

The 7 or b7 must be present in the chord for the 2 to "become" a 9. Otherwise it's just a 2 regardless of octave.

If the 2 replaces the 3 it would be called sus2. If the 3 is present it's an add2.

In Classical Theory the add2 chord was called a 9/8 suspension and had to be resolved to the triad. In Modern theory the add2 is a variant that stands on its own.

Examples of Classical 9/8 suspension:

--x--x----0---0
--3--1----3---1
--0--0----0---0
--2--2----x---x
--3--3----3---3
--x--x----x---x

Note that in these examples the "9" does reside in the second octave. But then something like this comes along:

---0---
---1---
---0---
---0---
---3---
---3---

Regards,
Monk

#25 wcostley

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Posted 26 October 2007 - 02:50 PM

The open chords talked about, I find extremely hard because the strings in that area stand so much higher up off the fret board which makes it real difficult (putting it mildly) to hold the strings down without touching the open strings next to them, it seems to me that you would need a real low action guitar to be able to play most of them.
Skip

#26 monk

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Posted 26 October 2007 - 03:24 PM

Skip,
These are playable on any guitar. Electric, acoustic or classic.

Be sure to arch your fingers and press straight down on the strings with your thumb in back of the neck. In fact, your fingers should never touch an adjacent sting unless you intend to mute it.

Regards,
Monk

#27 Fretsource

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Posted 26 October 2007 - 05:32 PM

Monk, that's interesting about the add2 v add9 naming convention. Over here, the use of add 9 is far more common than add 2 (which, of course, doesn't make it more correct). I know the reasoning behind both conventions, although the add 9 convention, (which names the added notes according to their equivalent extended position) isn't logical, using 9 & 11 instead of 2 & 4 and including "add" to differentiate them from true 9th and 11ths, but then using 6 instead of add 13.
How about the 6 add 9 chord? Do you prefer to call it 6 add 2? Or is their some special justification for using 9 in this case?

#28 Fretsource

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Posted 26 October 2007 - 06:13 PM

Sorry for going off topic a bit with my last post. Here are a couple of shapes to make up for it. :)

If you move C7 (x32310) up 2 frets it becomes D9
If you move it up another 2, it becomes E7.
And B7 (X21202) if moved up 5 frets also becomes E7

Apologies if they've already been posted. I quickly scanned through all but my eyes were out of focus by the time I got to the end :D

#29 eddiez152

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Posted 03 January 2008 - 11:16 PM

Doug,
Thanks for the thread on this. Lots of great info here from you and all.
Nothin sweeter than the sound of music comin out of a 6 string box - EZ me Music / ASCAP "Music is a social act of communication, a gesture of friendship,the strongest there is"-Malcolm Arnold

#30 deepangle

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Posted 29 August 2008 - 12:17 AM

These are very cool sounding chords amazing.

#31 blackcat

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Posted 01 October 2008 - 02:38 PM

some very nice sounds here!

#32 __tsidewinder__

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Posted 02 October 2008 - 10:38 PM

Someone aught to compile a list. All of em, named, in one place. That would be one heck of a handy reference.
Music is everybody's possession. It's only publishers who think that people own it.

-John Lennon

#33 gwnie

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Posted 05 November 2008 - 02:27 PM

What a great sound..

my head spinning a lot with the chord naming things, but still what a wonderful voice..

anyone can share a lot of those wonderful and unique sounded chord maybe?

i really appreciate it,, thanks

#34 CaptainVanVliet

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Posted 10 January 2009 - 10:22 AM

Hi,

wow a lot of this just sounds like chinese to me (been at it for under 2 months so no surprise, right?)
But you're right - they do sound GOOD - like the A although I haven't been able to slide it like you said. The E and D were nice, too - instantly more possibilities, and a chance to stretch out a bit after being stuck up the neck.
Barre chords are way beyon me for the moment (I can hold the Bm and the various E and A-shapes, but I can barely slide them up and down so too soon to get with it)

So anyway: THANKS!!!!!!!

#35 celticguitar666

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Posted 16 February 2009 - 01:07 PM

Here's a couple I use quite often I don't know the name of the chords in this positions they are an A amd D in first posistion or if somebody has already mentioned these:

----5-----
----5-----
----5-----
----------
----------
---------- you can move this up to 7 fret for a kind of Yes sound nice strummed or picked
or
-----------
----5------
----5-----
----5-----
----------
---------- same deal move up to 7 fret or slide back to first position
they can be modified through H and P or you can always Capo for a Little Traffic's John Barleycorn sound by placing the the capo on the fith fret.
Capos can be used for Barring to make life easier
Thanks for the other chords you listed they will make a nice addition to my playing
Dwight:smilinguitar:

#36 FatStrat

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Posted 19 August 2009 - 05:42 PM

You can slide a C7 up the neck without barring. Hear that a lot in Hendrix, Stevie Ray type stuff.

#37 hb

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Posted 19 August 2009 - 08:59 PM

You can slide a C7 up the neck without barring. Hear that a lot in Hendrix, Stevie Ray type stuff.


I tried that and some of them sound a little....clangy!...Are they all legitimate chords????
thanks,
hb

#38 ambetanterik

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Posted 20 August 2009 - 12:32 AM

Someone aught to compile a list. All of em, named, in one place. That would be one heck of a handy reference.


Categorised by what? The list would grow and grow and grow until it becomes useless. Its better to understand how they are built:
http://www.guitarfor...d-construction/

#39 solidwalnut

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Posted 11 November 2009 - 02:11 PM

I tried that and some of them sound a little....clangy!...Are they all legitimate chords????
thanks,
hb

Clangy...how? All chords are legit if the formation comprises a 1-3-5, which makes it a legal chord, a musical chord.

But some chord forms have other components of the scale, or how about just talking about power chords (usually a 1-5 or a 1-5-8). In that case, the 'chord' is a formation physically, but not necessarily musically in a legal sense!! Go figure.

I figure anything goes so long as it fits with what you want to express. The bottom line is that if the formation you are playing does not contain a 1-3-5, then the formation could be called ambiguous from the standpoint of having musical structure; the ability to hang a name on the chord is situational.
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Steve Cass
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#40 pHGTRSpider

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Posted 11 November 2009 - 05:23 PM

Hi All,

Here's some from a radiohead song (High & Dry) I learnt recently;

0-----0-----0-----0-----0
0-----0-----0-----0-----0
13---11----13-----9-----9
X-----X-----X-----X-----X
11----9----11-----7-----7
X-----X-----X-----X-----0

and

0-----0-----0
0-----0-----0
2-----6-----1
4-----7-----2
4-----7-----2
2(T)--5-----0

i.e. Just play F#m, Asus2 and E for the backing, simple but sweet.:smilinguitar: The F#m is best played using the thumb.

cheers,
pH
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