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Doug

Chords played up the neck without barres

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Doug    12

I know that barres are the bain of beginners and without them people tend not to play above the first position. But... there are some easy ways of playing chords up the neck by using the open strings. Some of these chords have a bit of flavouring added giving really cool jazzy tones.

Here's a really cool E (I put the fingering in brackets) try this one by hitting the low E then letting the chord ring - sounds really cool - love the lower octaves coming through.

------0------------------------

------0------------------------

------9(4)---------------------

------9(3)---------------------

------7(1)---------------------

------0------------------------

And a really easy A... (cool bluesy run is to slide from the 5 to the 6 on the G string)

------0------------------------

------5(1)---------------------

---[5]6(2)---------------------

------7(3)---------------------

------0------------------------

------X------------------------

And a D... (or shift it down 3 and it's a C)

------5(1)---------------------

------7(4)---------------------

------7(3)---------------------

------0------------------------

------X------------------------

------X------------------------

A beautiful sounding Amaj7 (follow that chord with a G# on the high E string - beautiful sound)

------0---[4]---------------------

------0------------------------

------6------------------------

------6------------------------

------0------------------------

------X------------------------

jazzy sounding Am's (with added degrees of various kinds)

------5(1)-----0------0----------

------5(1)-----0------0----------

------5(1)-----5------5----------

------5(1)-----5------7----------

------0--------0------7----------

------X--------X------X----------

And, of course, the possibilities are endless. Don't be afraid of noodling up the neck.

Have fun,

Doug

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wcostley    0

Doug,

This sounds very interesting, I'm mainly responding so I won't forget to put some time and thought into it.

I'm one of those still stuck up by the nut.

I can barr a decent F chord, but it takes me so long to get my fingers in the right position that it's more or less useless to me.

Thanks,

Skip

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Aunt Doty    0

Thanks a million Doug! I have been playing with some very talented players and have seen them play up the neck without using barres and was wondering what they were doing so now I can have an idea , at least a place to start!

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tomg123    0

Thanks doug i also find sweet sounding non-barre chords up the

neck. Alot can move around to. The A chord one you have can be

moved down concluding on Fmajor7 for a very nice progression

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Kirk Lorange    128

Nice one, Doug.

That first E5 is a great one to see if you're in tune.

The Amaj7 is actually a Amaj7add9 (no 3) ... the open B string is the 9. I guess since there's no 3 it's a sus2, not add 9. Who cares! It sounds beautiful.

Aunt Doty: You need to read PlaneTalk a couple more times! You don't need to be shown these things.

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monk    1

Kirk,

You were right the first time. It's an Amaj9. The 3 is hiding on the third string at the 6th fret.

The voices, low to high, are 5 1 7 3 9 5.

Here's a few more: Am add2 to AmMaj9 to Am9

---0---0---0---

---0---0---0---

---5---5---5---

---7---6---5---

---0---0---0---

---0---0---0---

Here's an A7 I learned from Jerry Reed:

---0---

---5---

---0---

---7---

---0---

---0---

An Em add 2:

---0---

---0---

---0---

---4---

---2---

---0---

Try moving the note on the 5th string up to 3 then 4 and back down for a James Bond vibe.

An A9:

---0---

---0---

---6---

---5---

---0---

---0---

Same shape as E7:

---0---

---0---

---7---

---6---

---x---

---0---

Enjoy,

Monk

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Doug    12

Kirk, thanks for pointing out my error with the Amaj9 - I shouldn't be so lazy about figuring out what notes are in there - it just "sounded" major 7th to me ;)

Monk, thanks for adding to the list.

One thing to point out though, is that these are not generally "moveable" chords like barre chords are (but they do sound cool).

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si16    10

Aadd9

0

0

6

7

0

x

This sounds good followed by the A Major Doug posted in the first post.

E major 7

x

9

8

9

x

0

and E7

x

9

7

9

x

0

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bmurnahan    1

If you remove the root there are many of these used by Chet Atkins when he does open string rolls. Remember, the bass player has the root.

---0------0------0-----0-----0-----0------0----------------

---0------7------0-----7-----0-----7------0----------------

---7------7------6-----6-----5-----5------4----------------

---6------6------5-----5-----4-----4------3----------------

-------------------------------------------------------------

-------------------------------------------------------------

E7 E9 A7 A13 D13 D9 G7

----0--------0---------0---------0---------------------

----0--------0---------0---------0---------------------

---13-------12-------11--------10----------------------

---12-------11-------10---------9----------------------

----------------------------------------------------------

----------------------------------------------------------

-----0-------0------0-------0--------0-----------------------

-----3-------2------1-------0--------0-----------------------

-----4-------4------2-------2--------1-----------------------

-----6-------5------4-------3--------3------------------------

--------------------------------------------------------

---------------------------------------------------------

Notice these are all some kind of 3 6 2 5 turnaround in G and they are all dominant 7ths. You can change a note here or there to see what other chord qualities you can come up with.

I also remember a Lenny Breau article from long ago about using open strings in chords and how each one can function. For instance the open E could be the 1 in E, a flat 9 in D# or Eb, 2 or 9 in D, etc and then seeing what you can come up with thinking along those lines. For instance....

--0------0-

--9------4-

--7------6--

--8------5--

---------6--

-----------

Bb7b5 Eb7b9

Some useful, maybe some not so useful but something to think about.

Have fun exploring!

Bob

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monk    1
Aadd9

0

0

6

7

0

x

Technically this chord is Aadd2. In order to be considered a 9 there has to be a 7 present.

Regards,

Monk

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si16    10
Technically this chord is Aadd2. In order to be considered a 9 there has to be a 7 present.

Regards,

Monk

I agree, A9 would be A C# E G B. The chord I wrote has a B but no G. My understanding of added chords convention is that the added note is always written an octave up from the root (regardless of whether it actually is or not). Is this incorrect?

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monk    1

si16,

Sorry. I may not have been clear about that.

A9=A C# E G B

Amaj9=A C# E G# B

Aadd2=A C# E B

The 7 or b7 must be present in the chord for the 2 to "become" a 9. Otherwise it's just a 2 regardless of octave.

If the 2 replaces the 3 it would be called sus2. If the 3 is present it's an add2.

In Classical Theory the add2 chord was called a 9/8 suspension and had to be resolved to the triad. In Modern theory the add2 is a variant that stands on its own.

Examples of Classical 9/8 suspension:

--x--x----0---0

--3--1----3---1

--0--0----0---0

--2--2----x---x

--3--3----3---3

--x--x----x---x

Note that in these examples the "9" does reside in the second octave. But then something like this comes along:

---0---

---1---

---0---

---0---

---3---

---3---

Regards,

Monk

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wcostley    0

The open chords talked about, I find extremely hard because the strings in that area stand so much higher up off the fret board which makes it real difficult (putting it mildly) to hold the strings down without touching the open strings next to them, it seems to me that you would need a real low action guitar to be able to play most of them.

Skip

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monk    1

Skip,

These are playable on any guitar. Electric, acoustic or classic.

Be sure to arch your fingers and press straight down on the strings with your thumb in back of the neck. In fact, your fingers should never touch an adjacent sting unless you intend to mute it.

Regards,

Monk

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