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carol m

Need some advice Audacity or Kristal?

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Hi Tekker, I already read that lesson so I have record level max for everything with 'microphone' selected, and for playback everything is also on max. I also have mic boost ticked in the Advanced settings.

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He He He!!!! I've cracked it. I had the mic too far away and not directed acurately enought to the sound hole. All I have to do know is to work out how to clean it up, and I know I saw how to do that somewhere in 'Help'.......and the Wallabies have just scored a try!!! :yeahhh:

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Hi Tekker, I already read that lesson so I have record level max for everything with 'microphone' selected, and for playback everything is also on max. I also have mic boost ticked in the Advanced settings.

Is there a way you could test the line input?

Do you have the proper cables and adapters to plug a guitar, CD player, or something into your line input to test it?

If this works, then I'd suspect the mic itself. Do you have another mic you could try?

-tkr

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He He He!!!! I've cracked it. I had the mic too far away and not directed acurately enought to the sound hole.

Excellent! :yeahhh:

-tkr

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I'm already working on my own tune, Eddie, that's why I had to have a go at cracking the recording thing. I still have work to do on refining the recording sound but I have the tune finished. Also, I need to go and buy a mic stand instead of propping the mic up in a coffee mug. ;)

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Also, I need to go and buy a mic stand instead of propping the mic up in a coffee mug. ;)

LOL, I accidently "propped" my cell phone in my coffee the other morning{Wednesday}...works today btw

Can't wait to hear your tune Carol M...:claping:

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Couldn''t stand all that yelling Kenny, had to delete it asap.

btw, I was awake enough to use an empty coffee mug. :smartass:

s16 beat me to it!!!!!! I deleted the first one at the same time, which has been over-ridden by Simon - I'm not sure why there is still one of your posts left, Kenny, so if the other one disappears too I'll re-instate it.

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I had the mic too far away and not directed acurately enought to the sound hole.

Don't direct your microphone to the sound hole!!! That's a big NO-NO... :) Your sound will be "explosive", i.e. your mic will catch sound that should be avoided (you'll probably hear pick hitting strings), you'll have a lot of "booms" and probably a lot of clipping...

You should aim your mic to the 12th fret, that's the safest method as far as I know...

All best

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Thanks for that advice namiguShin. When I get my mic stand I'll experiment with that in mind. When I say 'directed to the sound hole' I really meant vaguely in that vicinity rather than 3 feet away and off to the side!

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Carol:

Just wanted you to know I am looking forward to you having fun doing some recording. I wish I could offer some advice, but all my stuff is complicated and I don't understand half of it myself. Just remember it is not a contest and just do it from the heart and I am sure we will all love it.

Best wishes

Danny

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Hi there friends and helpers, I need some more advice with Audacity.

1) I have quite a bit of white noise, and 'help' says to go to 'Noise Removal' in the Effects menu, but all my effects menu is greyed out. In

'help' it says that 'effects' only work if you have 'Audio' selected but I can't find where and how to select 'Audio'.

2) I changed the 'Output level meter' (in the Meter Toolbar top right) to 'Input meter' which was good, but now I can't restore it to the original Output meter function (for seeing recording levels when listening to Playback).

Any ideas?

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1) I have quite a bit of white noise, and 'help' says to go to 'Noise Removal' in the Effects menu, but all my effects menu is greyed out. In

'help' it says that 'effects' only work if you have 'Audio' selected but I can't find where and how to select 'Audio'.

Ok, just click on the track with your left mouse button and drag it to the left or right... Release the button... ;) Edit: the part of the track from the point of clicking to the point of releasing should be selected... //

When you start recording you should let it record "nothing" for one second or two... I mean you should let Audacity record the "silence"... Then start playing... When you finish, select these first one or two seconds, go to "Noise Removal" and click on "Get Noise Profile"...

Then select the whole track (just double click on the track) and again "Noise Removal"... I have never tampered with this "Step 2"... Just click "OK" and it should be fine... :)

Hope this helps... ;)

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namiguShin has it covered, but also note that Audacity effects are permanent, the only way you can remove an effect is with the undo. So if you save and close the program, it is permanently applied there's no way to get the original audio back (as I don't think Audacity creates another file when appling the effects, but I could be wrong on that).

-tkr

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2) I changed the 'Output level meter' (in the Meter Toolbar top right) to 'Input meter' which was good, but now I can't restore it to the original Output meter function (for seeing recording levels when listening to Playback).

I'm not sure what is the problem... I have them both visual...

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namiguShin has it covered, but also note that Audacity effects are permanent, the only way you can remove an effect is with the undo. So if you save and close the program, it is permanently applied there's no way to get the original audio back (as I don't think Audacity creates another file when appling the effects, but I could be wrong on that).

-tkr

I'm using it just for fun, so I don't even try to save the original (dry) recordings... Because of my cheap "gear", and with all that noise they are not worth anything...

But I think that if you go to "Save Project" all of your changes would be saved... I think that you're referring to exporting files to MP3 or so...

Anyway, this save project thing is not as nearly as practical as using a real DAW, because you're tied up to the sequence of events you were doing... I think that you cannot remove an effect added somewhere in the middle of the process, you'll have to remove all of them done after that particular one... Not sure, haven't done this, but I think this is the way it goes...

On the other hand, when starting this discussion I said that Audacity is good as a free recorder for beginners, and that it is not a sequencer... It's good to start with, to start recording, and then you can import these recordings into a sequencer (like Kristal) when you get more advanced and want to start mixing... ;)

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namiguShin has it covered, but also note that Audacity effects are permanent, the only way you can remove an effect is with the undo. So if you save and close the program, it is permanently applied there's no way to get the original audio back (as I don't think Audacity creates another file when appling the effects, but I could be wrong on that).

-tkr

Good point tekker!

As a work around to this aspect of Audacity:

The initial recording is the *raw* material you are going to be working with. If you are multi-tracking, you want to get all your tracks recorded first. Without software effects! Obviously, if you are not satisfied with the first take, you can delete, remove, undo any particular track and do it over again. There is no rule that says you have to keep the first track you record.

Once you have your *raw* tracks down, SAVE YOUR PROJECT with what ever name you wish to name it.

Then save it again as another PROJECT with a different name. I always save a project as a song name and date, i.e., my_song-09-21-07 and then save it again as my_song-09-21-07-A. And of course, later saves will be saved with a B, C or whatever I want. Yes, this eats up disk space. Remember, you can always off load these huge files to a CD. It's a good idea to off load in case of hard drive failure anyway. You don't want to lose those special recording moments! ;)

Take your *second* saved PROJECT and use it as your working copy. Make your adjustments, add effects, noise removal or what have you, to this PROJECT. In other words you are mastering this project and not the original raw recording.

**

LC

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But I think that if you go to "Save Project" all of your changes would be saved... I think that you're referring to exporting files to MP3 or so...

The destructive effects overwrite your wave files that are associated with the project. Even if the project is saved with a different name it will still use the same wave files.

The only way to do what you suggested would be to save the complete project in a new folder. I don't know what this would be called in Audacity, but in Samplitude it is called "Save Complete Project In..." This basically copies all the files (including the wave files) associated with the project to a new location so that your original files are preserved.

On the other hand, when starting this discussion I said that Audacity is good as a free recorder for beginners, and that it is not a sequencer... It's good to start with, to start recording, and then you can import these recordings into a sequencer (like Kristal) when you get more advanced and want to start mixing... ;)

But that's the thing, Kristal and Reaper are not any more difficult to start with.

I'm in the process of making a tutorial that will cover basic recording in a series of basic steps that will apply to ANY recording program you use. Then these steps will be shown (with images) for Kristal, Reaper, and my recording program Samplitude in order to show how similar basic recording is across pretty much any recording platform. It's all a matter of getting to know that particular program and not really about having to "build up" to it.

Just because a program has more advanced features doesn't mean you have to use them right away (or at all). I still don't know the first thing about MIDI even though Samplitude is full of MIDI features. I don't need it, so I don't use it. ;)

But things like "non-destructive real time effects", while they may sound complicated make things SOOOOO much easier (especially for beginners).

- Non-destructive = The effects not applied directly to the wave files so your original recorded wave files are not overwritten.

- Real time = The effects are applied "live" within your recording program while your song is playing. Even when you close down the plugin window it is still running in the background, so you can open it back up again make any changes you want, and close it back down again.

If you do anything with effects (such as adding reverb to your vocals and guitar) then this one feature alone is priceless. :winkthumb: For example, if you decide at a later time that you added to much reverb, there's nothing you can do about it in Audacity. However, in Kristal or Reaper, you just simply open up the reverb plugin, turn down the reverb level, save, and that's it.

-tkr

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Once you have your *raw* tracks down, SAVE YOUR PROJECT with what ever name you wish to name it.

Interesting...... Since two people are saying the same thing, maybe this is the way Audacity works? :dunno:

Does Audacity create new wave files every time you save your project with a new name?

-tkr

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The destructive effects overwrite your wave files that are associated with the project. Even if the project is saved with a different name it will still use the same wave files.

Sorry, just to explain what I meant in the previous post... I meant that when you save a project, you're actually saving the whole history of changes you've made to the file...???

As I said, I wasn't working with Audacity very much regarding this issue, so I could be wrong... I.e. you're probably right, Tekker... :) I.e. I remember this history saving exists in a program I used long time ago... I'm just not sure if it's Audacity... :)

Once again, sorry if I made a confusion here... ;) Didn't mean to...

Edit: OK, I've just checked and I was wrong... :( When you save project you're not saving history... Sorry once again... I just wonder where have I seen this feature, what was the program...? Just crossed my mind, it could be it's not from audio recording/editing/mixing/... family at all... :dunno:

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