Jump to content
agent0064life

Custom paint job on electric?

Recommended Posts

Anyone ever gotten a custom paint job and about how much do they cost if I say, design everything in photoshop already placed on my guitar so they don't have to do the designing. I'm sure there is a wide range of how much one of these could cost but hey it's worth looking into.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

okay so I just searched the web and it seems there is a wide range of prices... thinking about painting one myself but I am the total opposite of an artist and a handyman... any tips?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I really depends on the experience of the painter really , I am an Automotive painter and have painted just about anything you can think of .

How much air brush work is needed , its the detail work that gets expensive , plus I use nothing but the finest paint products out there and they are very expensive !

I just did my buddies T-bucket and the paint on it was 200 bucks a quart and it took 2 quarts , he spent $1000 dollars on material and that was my cost . I didnt charge him anything , but if it was a customer it would of been $5000 dollars .

T-bucket

Then the sanding and buffing to get the mirror like finish on it afterwards takes alot of time .

Some of these custom painted motorcycles you see on TV have 20 - 50 THOUSAND dollar paint jobs , and there is little area on a bike , so dont faint when you find a Good painter and he gives you his quote .

Your paying for the talent and knowhow ,not just the labor .

Oh and if the guy is busy and good , and depending on the detail work you could be out of a guitar for several weeks or longer .

So it could be from a couple of hundred dollars to thousands , to answer your question .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh and I might add , you will have to take your guitar apart to paint the body , as you dont want to try and mask everything off to paint it ! Taking it down to just the body , no neck , no electronics , no bridge , just the wood body , can you do this ? or will you have to take it to a luthier ? another cost built in to the cost of the paint job .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Oh and I might add , you will have to take your guitar apart to paint the body , as you dont want to try and mask everything off to paint it ! Taking it down to just the body , no neck , no electronics , no bridge , just the wood body , can you do this ? or will you have to take it to a luthier ? another cost built in to the cost of the paint job .

yeah, although I read I might need to know soldering because I'll have to cut a wire inside somewhere, forgot which one. I have a telecaster clone I could try first, but who knows maybe I'll just get a custom pick guard because I would imagine they are a hell of a lot cheaper.

Also something else just popped in my head. Do you know anywhere that sells full sheet stickers (just a sheet that is essentially a high quality sticker but blank) that would be printer friendly? Could just design stuff on photoshop and stick it on. I'll hold off on a custom paint job 'til I'm either A, gigging, or B, have a good job.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You might be able to do your photoshop and print it on paper , then take it to a graphics / sign company ,that does stuff like vinyl transfers , and they may make it for you .

How drastic is your design ?

I custom painted a friends drum set in Kandy Brandywine :) Man they came out slick ! He shipped them to me all tore down and I sent them back to him , he lives in Indiana , and I live in Kansas .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Oh and I might add , you will have to take your guitar apart to paint the body , as you dont want to try and mask everything off to paint it ! Taking it down to just the body , no neck , no electronics , no bridge , just the wood body , can you do this ? or will you have to take it to a luthier ? another cost built in to the cost of the paint job .

why should u not just mask everything other than it would take all lot of work

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wouldn't mask it off because you're always going to see some edges that will immediately identify the work as being amateur. Also the surface of the guitar is going to need preparation and you don't want to damage or scuff the screwed on non-painted parts. If you just want a quick and cheap job then no big deal. But if you expect high standards then take it apart.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
can anyone answer me? hello

Gee, you waited for 8 minutes and got impatient. This is not a real-time chat.

Anyway, to answer: If you want the paint job to look professional then you should remove the old paint first. You don't have to if you don't care about the final result, or if a basic amateur paint job is good enough.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
r u sopposed to use spray paint or regular paint
Based on the level of knowledge you seem to have I wouldn't be painting an expensive guitar. You should use spray paint. But if you want to do a good job you should also start looking for instruction on how to paint. That is something you won't find on a guitar related web site. You probably don't need to strip the guitar down to the wood to get good results. In fact it may give worse results as it complicates the preparation of the base coat. But you do need to know how to prepare the surface and what kind of paint is appropriate to use.

For a quick job you can take the guitar apart and use wet/dry sandpaper to remove the gloss so the new paint will adhere. Wet/dry comes in various abrasive qualities with a number indicating it's abrasiveness. The higher the number the finer the sandpaper. You should do a search on the use of wet/dry sandpaper and get and idea of how to use it. You could use spray cans to apply the final coat. But getting good results requires good technique. So you may want to practice on something other than your guitar.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 more question do you really have to take of the old paint?

If you're planning a solid colour repaint then you don't need to remove the original paint. You only really need to strip a guitar down to the wood if you're planning to apply a clear finish to the guitar - but invariably, most electrics with a factory painted solid colour finish are made with basswoods that probably aren't going to look that great revealed anyway.

All your doing by stripping back to the wood is giving yourself the extra work of re- sealing the wood, grain filling and priming from scratch - jobs which have already been done by the original finishers.

If the paint already on the guitar is very heavily applied you'd probably be wise to rub it back before applying primers, basecoats, and whatever finish your planning to use (after all, you don't want 2mm of paint on your guitar when you're done). If the original paint finish is well applied (ie., thin and even), then all you need to do is rub the original finish back with 800 or even 1000 grade wet and dry until the surface is completely 'matt' looking and perfectly smooth (no shiney areas remaining), fill any larger chips or dents with something like Isopon P38 (autobody filler), then rub the filler down until it's perfectly smooth, then prime the guitar (with a suitable primer for your finish paint). Rub the primer coat down until it is perfectly smooth, again with 1000 grade wet and dry..........and having repeated the above stages 'AS MANY TIMES AS IS NECESSARY' until the body is perfectly primed and smooth - then, you can start to apply your colour and finally, whatever finish coat you're planning to use. Lot's of work.

Preparation is absolutely 'THE' key to any guitar refinish/repaint.

Skimp on the preparation and however well you execute the rest of the process you'll ALWAYS end up with a less than satisfactory finish. Always mask your neck pocket and any shielded electrical and pickup cavities too. If you don't mask the neck pocket there's no guarantee your neck will refit properly after the refinish is all done and dusted.

If you've got any doubts about being able to commit the time and effort necessary to produce a good finish on your guitar, or you're planning to refinish an already really nice guitar - I'd advise you to consider very carefully before you start. :escape:

While painting and refinishing guitars certainly isn't rocket science - it can and does have lot's of pitfalls for the unwary, impatient, or ill informed.

Ideally, if you can practice on an old scruffy guitar body first it's always the best way to go. But good luck with it if you do have a go.

There are few things more satisfying than putting the effort in on a scruffy looking tatty old guitar body............and getting a gleaming, new looking beastie at the end of your labours!

Jim :winkthumb:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Based on the level of knowledge you seem to have I wouldn't be painting an expensive guitar...

I couldn't agree more. It's much easier to botch a paint job on a guitar than it is to get it right. If you don't know what you're doing, chances are about 99% that you will botch it, and end up with a shoddy-looking guitar.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Anyone ever gotten a custom paint job and about how much do they cost if I say, design everything in photoshop already placed on my guitar so they don't have to do the designing. I'm sure there is a wide range of how much one of these could cost but hey it's worth looking into.

You'll be looking at anywhere between £250 for a very basic custom repaint and refinish, up to £1500-£2000 for a more complicated or highly detailed design and top notch refinish.

It's a lot of dosh for good guitar artwork, but there is an awful lot of work involved when you start getting to the upper end of the market and that's what your paying for.

If you can and have the knowledge to do a decent straight forward single colour refinish on your guitar, doing fairly basic custom work isn't that difficult to achieve - really all depends on what your looking to get done.

Jim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×