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Buzzz! strings too low? Too high? READ THIS!!

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jeansen    0

Allthumbs:great link ..thx u a lot!!

First you have to restring your guitar

i've got an idea last night: instead of restringing my guitar...how about using a ruler and put it over the frets at a 90 degrees (upright position) to the fretboard and then do exactly the same as the UGB instructions?can i do that?i mean, the string is for giving a straight line,right?so..it is ok to substitute the string with a ruler,right? btw,i've heard some opinions that telling me to use a ruler that made of from steel ( a steel ruler) ? is it a must?why?

and how long ? will a 30 cm ruler do the work? or i do need a longer one?

thx u a lot...

again,sorry for bad english...hope you all know what i mean..btw,almost all of My questions haven't been answered yet,please take a look at it,cause i need those answers badly... thx u

best regards,

Jeansen

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allthumbs    8

Nope. The strings help you see how much of a bow is in the neck caused by string tension. No strings, no tension on the neck, no way to measure string height. No way around it. Put the strings on first. It is the way it's done.

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eddiez152    129

UGB,

Do you have an illustration of the truss rod in an acoustic neck ? I would like to understand its purpose. What happens when its tightened or loosened.

eddiez152

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jeansen    0

hi,just wanna ask you..how can i know if my guitar have a single way truss rod or a 2 two way truss rod?is there any different physical thing between them so i can recognize them easily?i've noticed that my truss rod nut has a yellow color(a brass maybe?,i don't know)..is it mean anything?

oh ya, same as Eddiez's question..how about acoustic's truss rod adjustion? is it just the same as UGB instructions? and which truss rod they (acoustic or classical) usually used?is it 2 way or single way truss rod?

thx u

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jeansen    0

oh ya, another question..one of my truss rod cover's screw have been stripped..how can i fix it? it is very small and i have no idea how to unscrew it now cause the screwdriver i used doesn't fit with that one screw again...please help..thx u :yes:

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99% of acoustics have the truss rod adjustment nut located inside the body of the guitar coming out of the neck just an inch or two from the sound hole. Some have it on the headstock like an electric. Most classical guitars don't have an adjustable truss rod.

Double way just requires LESS adjustment than a single, that's why you don't do too much when making the adjustment in the first place. To my knowledge, you can't tell what you have by the nut sticking out at the end.

Try a variety of screwdriver sizes and shapes, ie go with a straight/flat blade as opposed to a phillips, and try to get it out that way. You can also drill it out or carefully use superglue to glue another screw on top of the stripped one and then back them out. Once you get enough of the screw head showing, you should be able to grab it with needle nose pliers to finish turning it out.

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eddiez152    129

UGB,

I started a thread on the setup of the fretboard. To see a clearer picture of this went to Taylor's site and found a PDF file on this issue. I have read your thread on the subject and was hoping you might show up on mine.

For a moment I thought that my guitar was out of wack. I could not understand why we would want a relief on the neck. Now, I do know that we certainly don't want the neck bowing back. But that valley in the middle ? I :surrender

Just trying to understand this. If you got a valley, then the board it going uphill with the strings on each side of your finger from the 5-6-7 th fret.

eddiez152

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eddiez152    129

UGB,

Thanks for this link. I have been struggling with this theory for some time. I looked at the NT neck system on Taylor's site. The referance to the straight neck was beginning to bother me. I understand string angle from nut to saddle, but that slight curve was killing me.

eddiez152

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sabretalon    0

This will help me out soon.

My guitar which is second hand, the action is just a little too low, the sixth string buzzes, the rest are OK. So after reading what you put, I see I need a little more relief! I guess I need to read up on the intonation bit as well?

My daughters guitar is brand new and the action as way too high. Hers is a strat copy with tremelo, I'm sort of guessing I do it the same?

I'll probably look to replace my strings as well as I don't know how long these one's have been on the guitar. On that note, what strings should I go for? I think the ones on are a thin gauge but not 100% sure. Is it best to just take the strings with me when I go for new ones?

Just need to buy in some tools for making the adjustments and then I will give it a go.

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sabretalon    0

Mine is an Electric Vintage (make not age) not too sure on model as the V8 is similar but this one is strung through the body without a tremelo.

My daughters is a Stagg s350, strat copy.

I have pics of mine but can't post them as I have not posted enough threads yet.

It apparently is a V8 Jackson hardtail. It has the jackson type headstock and a Tune-O-Matic bridge, if that helps.

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Cool axe! Does the buzz on the 6th string come through the amp? All of my electrics buzz because I like super low action but you can't hear that buzz through the amp. If it does, check the relief and if it's ok you'll have to raise that side of the bridge a bit. That's the only down fall of a tuneomatic; you can't adjust the saddles individually. If you go up to a higher gauge string that will cut back on buzzing too because the thicker string requires more tension. Perhaps you could try a hybrid set like a heavy bottom light top. Light guage strings for 1,2, and 3 and then medium guage strings for 4, 5, and 6.

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sabretalon    0

Thanks,

I think what I will do first is put on some new strings. This was bought second hand so I don't know how long the strings have been on or the quality of them.

I can hear the buzz through the amp as well, only a little but it is noticeable.

I'll see how it goes with new strings and if not then I will raise the bar! LOL

Just on the strings, as a beginner is it better to go medium or light? Or should I take the strings I have currently fitted and ask for the same gauge at the shop? I don't tend to be heavy handed or do any bends if that effects the choice?

Thanks for the advice.

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Chomsky    0

Hello, Just wanted to say a few things. I had read over the posts on this and wanted to just give a few tips. I have done setup on all my guitars, some more than once. You should setup anytime you buy a new or used guitar, change to different gauge strings (since the different tensions will require some adjustment), change your music style (fingerpickers usually want a easy to play, low action, while bluegrass and rhythm players will want the strings higher so they dont rattle), or after extended use (just like a car, your guitar needs tune-ups). First, Loose frets. You never want to remove the frets, unless it is damaged, in which case you will need a new fret and that is quite a job to get it square with all your other frets, so leave that to a pro. Fixing loose frets is quite easy, first you need to check which fret(s) is loose. Check them all, one by one, by pressing on each side of the fret with your finger and letting go to see if there is any movement. You do have to press quite hard, I use the point of pliers I have, make sure if you use a tool it does not have a sharp end, you dont want to damage your fretboard. And make sure you do this on both sides of the fret. If you find a loose fret, turn the guitar so the loose end of the fret is pointing up, get some cyanoacrylate or Krazy glue, press the loose end to the fingerboard and let one drop of krazy glue fall on the side of the fret so the glue will run down between the fret and the board. Hold the fret there until the glue is dried, only takes a few minutes. If there is any excess glue on the side of your fingerboard you can just go over it with some very fine 600 grit sandpaper. IF YOU GET THE GLUE ON YOUR HANDS, IT CAN BE TAKEN OFF WITH ACETONE, DONT EVER PUT ACETONE ON THE GUITAR AS IT WILL DISSOLVE THE FINISH. If that doesnt fix your loose fret you may have a more serious problem and should take it to a pro. Second, Checking your neck and adjusting trussrod. To check if your neck is straight, first remove your strings and then use a straight-edge. A ruler is not a straight-edge, it may look straight but chances are, it isnt. Lay the straight-edge on the fretboard in the middle from the 1st fret to behind the 12th or 14th fret (that will cover the area that can actually be adjusted) and make sure all the frets touch the straight-edge. If they do, you have a straight neck, if you can see some distance between the fretboard and straight-edge near the 5th or 6th fret you have a "hollow" bend, if you can "rock" the straight edge, then your neck has a back bow. The trussrod is a steel rod put in the neck for reinforcement. It does not, as alot of people think, adjust the angle of how the neck is fixed to the guitar body. The trussrod can only straighten the neck between the nut and the 12th to 14th fret, depending on the system used. Most Martin Guitars do not have a trussrod, but can be adjusted since the material used is such high quality. DO NOT ATTEMPT TO ADJUST THE TRUSSROD OR STRAIGHTEN THE NECK WHILE STRINGS ARE TUNED, REMOVE THEM OR AT LEAST LOOSEN THEM LIBERALLY. Straightening the neck with the trussrod is simple, if your neck has a "hollow" bend then turn with your wrench (most guitars have special wrenches which may have come with your guitar to adjust the trussrod, you can usually find something that will fit at either a music or hardware store) the nut of the trussrod clockwise, and continuing to check the adjustment with your straight edge. Only go little by little, no more than quarter turns and check each time. If a back bow is your problem then turn counter-clockwise. Keep checking and your neck should come to a straight position. It sometimes doesnt work if the trussrod was accidently glued to the wood of the neck. You can help this by turning the nut loose and support the neck at both ends. Press with one hand in the middle of the neck and you will hear a crack as the glue is breaking from the trussrod. BE CAREFUL, it doesnt take much to break the glue, nor does it take much to snap the neck. Then go through the other steps. I had wanted to mention checking for uneven frets and Filing, Dressing or Honing frets, but this is very tedious and time consuming work and would take some time to explain so it is done correctly. To straighten the neck with the body to a electric guitar with a removable neck, just loosen the screws holding the neck to body and add a shim of some sort, I usually just use sandpaper folded on itself, to either the front or back depending on which way you need to go to straighten it out. Some Fender's have a metal plate on the back that has 3 screws that bolt the body to the neck, with these necks you'll find a little hole with an adjustable screw in the neckplate. All you do in this case is loosen up the 3 screws, adjust the neck angle with the adjusting screw. You will need a small Allen wrench, size 1/16". If you tighten that screw the neck will go backward, if you loosen it the neck will come forward. When the neck is inline with the body, retighten the 3 bolts. Les Paul's and others have necks that are supposed to be a little offset from the body and will appear to not be straight with the body. That is normal. Third and last thing, setting up action or relief on the guitar. Action is actually the resistance of the strings when you pressdown. This can all be adjusted with the saddle/bridge (I'll call it the saddle, usually with electrics they are just one piece), strings, and nut. There is no oneway setup with this, it is up to you what type of action you want and what kind of music style you are playing. Your just gonna have to try out a few different combinations till you find what is best for you. To adjust the saddle, there are a few basic types that are consistantly used. I call them the Gibson type and the Fender type. Gibson saddle height is adjusted with a big screwdriver. On both sides of the saddle are adjusting screws which are also saddle supports. You can either adjust both, or have one side higher than the other, its up to you. Some of the gibsons have adjusting wheels instead of screws. The Fender type bridge has 3 or 6 seperate saddles, each adjustable in height, You need a Allen 1/16" to adjust these. Make sure you keep them in an arched fashion like the fretboard. Try it out playing, make sure you arent stumbling over strings. If you can go smoothly from one string to the next, you have it right. If there is any buzz, raise the saddle up a little and try it again. Remember to keep that important arch. It is trial and error til you get it where you want. Also note that if when you get the height to where you want it, if the strings are touching the pickups, you can lower the pickups. There is an adjusting screw on each side of these as well. To lower just turn the screws counterclockwise. The closer the pickup is to the string the more volume you will get, so you can adjust the volume balance by adjusting the pickups as well. Some acoustics have an adjustable saddle, but many dont. The steps required to adjust saddle height and bridge on acoustic is very tedious. I will put them in a post if anyone asks. If you have an issue with the nut at the top being too low or high, this is an easy fix. Note: If you have a zero nut, which is a much better system, yet rarely used, then string height is determined by the zero fret, which is the same height as your other frets. For this reason your string height will be as perfect as it can get. If you need to raise the nut, remove the nut by taking a small piece of wood and tap it with a small hammer while holding it against the nut. GO SLOW, BE CAREFUL!! When its loose, take the wood and tap on the side of the nut and it will slide out. Then clean off the nut, and glue a shim about 1/8" thick to the bottom of the nut, Use bone, plastic or hard wood as the shim. Shim should be a little larger than the nut. When the glue dries, file off the excess material till it is almost flush with the nut, you can trim off the remains with a utility knive so you dont have file marks all over the nut. Clean the area the nut was in, and glue it back with a drop or 2 of krazy glue. Re-string, tune and check height. It will most likely be too high now. Any space larger than the space needed to clear the 1st fret is too much. Loosen string and pull it out of the string slot. You can lower them but filing the string slot with a needle file or even a hacksaw blade, or if you want, there are nut files you can buy, they are not cheap, but very convenient. Or you can simply fold some sandpaper and deepen the slot with a sawing motion, be careful to keep rechecking the slot, dont make it too deep and dont widen it more then the string that is going to be placed in there. This is delicate, but once done, you wont have to bother with the nut again. You may want to protect you headstock or fingerboard with some layers of masking tape. Just file, put string back in slot, tune and check, if still too high, loosen, pull, saw, re-check. No other way to do it. Once you have the correct height, you can file down the top of the nut to get rid of excess material. If you are installing a brand new nut, it is the same installation, just mark lines where the strings will go on the nut blank so that the strings are evenly apart. That is it. Your guitar is finally setup the proper way. If anyone has questions or would like to know how to setup for left-handed use, or some techniques used to repairing acoustics that dont have the same adjustability as the electrics, let me know, I will be more than happy to put up a post about that as well. Hope this information is useful. I know its a long post, but somethings cant be explained in a paragraph. I'm just glad to contribute to this great site. Enjoy!

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jeansen    0

hi,wow!welcome n thx u a lot for ur contribution....btw,just few question that frustrated me for long:

1)what can i use to clean a glue mark in my guitar body?could i use the benzene?

2) how about adjusting the truss rod on ibanez?should i need to detune-adjust the truss rod-bring it up to pitch-look at the gap at 6 or 7th fret-detune-adjust truss rod-bring it up to pitch again and so on?i'm asking this because i want to know is there any simpler way for adjusting truss rod on a floyd rose equipped guitar ( as u know it is quiet frustrating to tune the strings on a floyd rose equipped guitar)....

3) u've mentioned about putting a straightedge from the 1st fret to the 14th fret.....but a luthier told me to put the straight edge from 1st fret to 24th fret (the whole fingerboard)?can i do this? if i can, where should i see the gap in ibanez guitar(with 24 frets)?

thx u ,pliz reply...

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Chomsky    0
hi,wow!welcome n thx u a lot for ur contribution....btw,just few question that frustrated me for long:

1)what can i use to clean a glue mark in my guitar body?could i use the benzene?

2) how about adjusting the truss rod on ibanez?should i need to detune-adjust the truss rod-bring it up to pitch-look at the gap at 6 or 7th fret-detune-adjust truss rod-bring it up to pitch again and so on?i'm asking this because i want to know is there any simpler way for adjusting truss rod on a floyd rose equipped guitar ( as u know it is quiet frustrating to tune the strings on a floyd rose equipped guitar)....

3) u've mentioned about putting a straightedge from the 1st fret to the 14th fret.....but a luthier told me to put the straight edge from 1st fret to 24th fret (the whole fingerboard)?can i do this? if i can, where should i see the gap in ibanez guitar(with 24 frets)?

thx u ,pliz reply...

No problem, happy to contribute, Removing glue from the body can be tough, there is a product called "goop off" that I use, you can also use lighter fluid, dont know about the benzene, I haven't tried that so I don't want to say go ahead and have you ruin your baby. Just don't smoke or spark anything while your doing it if you use the lighter fluid. You are gonna have to really saturate it and then use something rubber or plastic with a strong end to scrap it off, I use one of those plastic scrapers used for dishes. If your guitar has the clear coat still on, the glue should come off easily then, just go slow.

The Ibanez (which I have a Ibanez AX7221 7-string) is the same as the others, pull the plastic cover piece off the top of the neck, you'll see the nut of the truss rod. Remember though that the truss rod is only used if your neck has become bent or bowed. You do not use this to adjust anything with the action of the guitar or to detune and tune the guitar. To do that, use the bridge/saddle and make sure the neck is in line and straight with the body as well. You can then adjust the pickups and should be good. I have not had much, if any, experience with a Floyd Rose system, I am guessing since you asked about Ibanez, you have the Ibanez Edge Pro tremolo, which are considered better than the Floyd Rose originals, but I am not sure how you would want to go about this. I do know they have a locking nut which prevents you from using the tuning heads and a floating bridge which is also locked in position by the tension of the strings and springs under the bridge that keep it balanced and straight, you may just have to add an extra spring in the back, guitarist use anywhere from 1 to 5 springs depending on their own preference and setup. I had a similar issue with a buddies guitar where the bridge kept pulling up an inch off the body of the guitar every time I got close to standard tuning and then it would be out of tune 2 min later. I ripped off the cover on the back and only saw 2 springs, so I added an extra spring (you can get them cheap at any music store) to the bridge and POOF, perfect tune, bridge stayed where it was supposed to be and it didn't go out of tune 2 min later, actually it held tune very well. The Floyd Rose also have fine tuner heads on the bridge which is used to fine tune the guitar after is has been tuned and the lock is in place. Also they are very serviceable, and once you do have the thing in tune, you shouldn't have to re-tune often, since it is a pain to re-tune these since tuning every string causes the other strings to drop in tune. I really believe adding another spring to the bridge is all you really need to do, don't go playing around with the truss rod too much, that is only there to fix minor issues with the neck and as a support to prevent the neck from bending. If you are really having an issue with keeping the guitar in tune, it may be a number of other things that are causing that, so have a pro look at it, someone with experience with this type of setup. They can set it up the proper way so you don't have any further issues. I would take it to a store that has someone who can look at it in shop, I don't like places that have to send the guitar out to someone cause I like to see what the person is doing to my beautiful guitar and ask them questions about what I can do to prevent the problem from occurring again All "Martin" guitars and quite alot of classical guitars have no truss rod and if they ever need to have the neck straightened, I recommend taking it to a pro. The do something called a "heat-set" to get it back to position by heating the wood and bending the neck to get it back to straight. It is not easy and you have to have alot of experience with it before even attempting it on a guitar worth any money cause you actually have to over bend alot since the wood tries to spring back into its original shape. DO NOT ATTEMPT AT HOME!!!

With the straight-edge thing, If you have one that goes all the way down the fretboard, use it. Usually the only part of the neck that can be adjusted with the truss-rod is from the 1st to just past the 14th fret, the truss rod doesn't actually go all the way down the neck, it ends just after that point, depending on the system used. Some fenders and acoustics have the truss rod bolt at the base of the neck near the pickups and these do run the length of the neck, but the area of adjustment is still usually only from the 1st to just past 14th fret. In any case use the biggest tool you can get, that goes for any job you do with anything. :) As for where you should see the gap, you shouldn't, if there is any gap, then adjust the truss rod to get rid of the gap. The neck should always be straight, also make sure if you see any gap, it isn't being caused by uneven frets, which can be fixed by filing and honing the frets. That isn't an easy job, but its not difficult either, if you have the right tools. If you do have this issue, you can message me and I will be more than happy to post how to do that and how to make the tools needed to perform the job.

I hope this answered your questions and I'm glad I could help. Hope to hear how it turns out for you. It isn't easy working on the guitar, but is very rewarding to play a guitar that sounds great knowing you made it that way, plus the more you know about the physical and mechanical aspects of the guitar, the more you can adjust and setup to your own preference or music style. :smilinguitar:

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Chomsky    0

Wanted to post a list of the most common causes of buzzing and what to do about it.

1) Strings not tuned to pitch

2) Old strings

3) Loose frets

4) Uneven frets

5) Neck has twisted or warped

6) Not enough or no relief in the neck

7) Set-screws loose in tuning peg (These are on the top of the tuner head)

8) Nut or fill ring on top of tuning peg is loose (This is the ring around the front of the tuner peg)

9) Screw that holds tuner peg in place is loose (This is a screw on the back that hold the tuner in position on the neck)

10) Loose string ends touching peg head or something else

11) Worn out saddle

12) Worn out nut

13) Loose bridge pin (Acoustic Guitar)

14) Loose brace(s) and/or bridge plate

15) Loose saddle

16) Loose nut

17) Loose nut on truss rod

How to fix:

1) Tune the guitar

2) Replace with new strings

3) Fix loose frets

4) File, Dress or Hone frets

5) See professional repairman

6) Adjust relief

7) Tighten screws

8) Tighten the nut

9) Tighten the screw

10) Cut off string ends

11) File top of saddle or replace saddle

12) Replace nut

13) Press bridge pin deeper in bridgepin hole (Acoustic Guitar)

14) See professional repairman

15) Replace saddle

16) Reglue nut

17) Tighten nut (dont overtighten and move truss rod, just tighten till nut is tight against the truss rod)

This will take care of any buzzing that you could ever experiance with your guitar and will save you alot of headaches trying to figure out what it may be. Hope this is useful. Enjoy!!

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jeansen    0
The Ibanez (which I have a Ibanez AX7221 7-string) is the same as the others, pull the plastic cover piece off the top of the neck, you'll see the nut of the truss rod. Remember though that the truss rod is only used if your neck has become bent or bowed. You do not use this to adjust anything with the action of the guitar or to detune and tune the guitar. To do that, use the bridge/saddle and make sure the neck is in line and straight with the body as well. You can then adjust the pickups and should be good. I have not had much, if any, experience with a Floyd Rose system, I am guessing since you asked about Ibanez, you have the Ibanez Edge Pro tremolo, which are considered better than the Floyd Rose originals, but I am not sure how you would want to go about this. I do know they have a locking nut which prevents you from using the tuning heads and a floating bridge which is also locked in position by the tension of the strings and springs under the bridge that keep it balanced and straight, you may just have to add an extra spring in the back, guitarist use anywhere from 1 to 5 springs depending on their own preference and setup. I had a similar issue with a buddies guitar where the bridge kept pulling up an inch off the body of the guitar every time I got close to standard tuning and then it would be out of tune 2 min later. I ripped off the cover on the back and only saw 2 springs, so I added an extra spring (you can get them cheap at any music store) to the bridge and POOF, perfect tune, bridge stayed where it was supposed to be and it didn't go out of tune 2 min later, actually it held tune very well. The Floyd Rose also have fine tuner heads on the bridge which is used to fine tune the guitar after is has been tuned and the lock is in place. Also they are very serviceable, and once you do have the thing in tune, you shouldn't have to re-tune often, since it is a pain to re-tune these since tuning every string causes the other strings to drop in tune. I really believe adding another spring to the bridge is all you really need to do, don't go playing around with the truss rod too much, that is only there to fix minor issues with the neck and as a support to prevent the neck from bending. If you are really having an issue with keeping the guitar in tune, it may be a number of other things that are causing that, so have a pro look at it, someone with experience with this type of setup. They can set it up the proper way so you don't have any further issues. I would take it to a store that has someone who can look at it in shop, I don't like places that have to send the guitar out to someone cause I like to see what the person is doing to my beautiful guitar and ask them questions about what I can do to prevent the problem from occurring again All "Martin" guitars and quite alot of classical guitars have no truss rod and if they ever need to have the neck straightened, I recommend taking it to a pro. The do something called a "heat-set" to get it back to position by heating the wood and bending the neck to get it back to straight. It is not easy and you have to have alot of experience with it before even attempting it on a guitar worth any money cause you actually have to over bend alot since the wood tries to spring back into its original shape. DO NOT ATTEMPT AT HOME!!!

Chomsky:thx for the reply...really appreciate it....all of the answers are great...but i am sorry for my bad english...so u misunderstanding my 2nd question...it is because of my english, so sorry for my bad english....

actually,my question is,here it is ...

i found out that when i'm ready to turn my allen key for adjusting my truss rod...my allen key movement is so limited because of the strings "wall"(the string tension is acting just like a wall for my allen key movement) ....i need to loose the string tension so that i can turn my allen key liberately...so, my question is...is it ok if i adjust the truss rod in order like this?:

1.see if there is any gap

2. loosen the string,so that i can turn my allen key without any limitation from the strings tension

3.adjust the truss rod

4.bring the strings up to pitch again and then see if there is any gap again..if the neck hasn't straight yet,then i will do the above procedure again...1.loosen the string, 2.adjust the truss rod, 3.bring the strings up to piitch again n see if there is any gap again, and so on,and so on...

can i do the above procedure?or is it (loosen the strings ,adjust truss rod,bring the strings up to pitch procedure) harmful for the neck n the truss rod? if it is,what should i do then? n if it is not dangerous, is it harmful for the neck n the truss rod if i do this procedure OFTEN?

or do have you any other idea how to manage this situation so that i can adjust my truss rod without loosen the strings? (because, as u know,tuning a floyd rose equipped guitar is a headache)

hope u do understand what i mean...thx u..

btw,if i want to have a relief , where should i see the gap (on the 24 frets guitar)?

thx again..so much..

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knight46    2

Jensen,

You are correct, adjusting the truss rod is sometimes difficult due to the location of the strings and the amount of room you have to operate. I broke a string one time adjusting the truss rod, before I realized that I was doing damage to the string. It is OK and some say necessary to loosen the strings prior to adjusting the truss rod.

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Chomsky    0

Hey Jeansen, as long as you are loosening the strings and then adjusting, you wont be causing any damage to the neck or strings or truss rod. You are gonna have to repeat the steps pften, and it is fine to do it often. You can do it as much as you would like. The relief in the neck will depend on which fret on the neck meets up with the body, most guitars usually attach near the 15th to 17th fret. Think of this as an anchor, if the neck bends at all it will be between the nut and 15th fret. As the strings tension increases on the headstock where the tuning peg are, then the neck will be pulled toward the body of the guitar. So it should be in the middle, near the 7th fret. So that is where you would see your gap and it might extend out a bit the more of a bend you have. You will have to tune the strings to tune to check the gaps each time unfortunatly. If you see any uneven areas below or above that point, it might be uneven frets, or even an uneven fretboard. If you are having to adjust the truss rod a lot and still not seeing the neck straighten there may be another issues. Uneven frets can easily be fixed, and even an uneven fretboard can be corrected as well. More than likely this isnt your issue, but it is worth mentioning since it can happen. In either case, if your doing alot of adjustment and not seeing progress, take it to a pro. Just remember, you will have to tune each time you make an adjustment, and if you make small turns you shouldnt damage your strings. I think knight46 might have been rubbing the allen key against his strings which caused his string damage. As long as your careful, as you should be with any work you do on your guitars, then you should be fine. If you are worried about the strings, take them off entirely. But you should be able to get away with just loosening the strings up, also remember to let the tension off the neck slowly, the neck of any guitar hates when the tension is suddenly released, I remember watching a buddy change strings and he took cutters and just cut all his strings while the guitar was still tuned, dont ever do that. It is bad to do that. Hope this helps, and hope it works for you. :smilinguitar:

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jeansen    0

wow..thx u,kNIGHT46 and Chomsky...i'm a little relax to set up my own guitar now...haha:smilinguitar:

You will have to tune the strings to tune to check the gaps each time unfortunatly

arghh...time to practise my patience on tuning the floyd rose now then....:yeahhh:;)

thx u ,guys....thx a lot...:yeahhh:

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derek6107    0

Hey UGB this is great advice - many thanks. Can you help with advice on the set-up for a Yamaha APX-3 electic acoustic? I have been playing this for about a year and it is my first guitar. How high would you say the action should be and how should I go about adjusting the string action?

Many thanks

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