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solidwalnut

New Lesson: Lead Guitar Techniques -- Falling Leaves

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This has been my first venture away from the open string area of the first 4 frets, it reminds me of playing in the ocean when I was a kid and finding myself out to far over my head instead of staying in the safety of where I could stand in the shallower water on the sand, it's a bit unerving and a little scary.

Skip ........:scared:

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This has been my first venture away from the open string area of the first 4 frets, it reminds me of playing in the ocean when I was a kid and finding myself out to far over my head instead of staying in the safety of where I could stand in the shallower water on the sand, it's a bit unerving and a little scary.

Skip ........:scared:

Just have fun! And think about how this is in the key of C, and that the notes come from the shapes. The first 6 notes come from the E form barre of the C chord at the 8th fret. The next 8 notes come from the G form barre of the C chord at the 8th fret (this is not one that you would normally play, but just so you get the picture on the neck) and the last 16 notes come from the A form barre of the C chord at the third fret. Notice how the shapes share a common fret.

Just get the CAGED picture of the fretboard in your mind.

cagedblue.gif

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Nice one Steve looks great! By the way what axe are you playing there?

Thanks again for your efforts.

Thanks tonedeaf. That's my baby. My Taylor 714ce.

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I uploaded a new lesson on lead guitar techniques called Falling Leaves. It's an exercise that can be used with other notes as well as those presented.

I hope you enjoy!

Steve

Steve, I have a question on the tab - on the second half, the fifth note over is a 4 on the D string, which is an F#, every time I attempt to play this half of the tune something doesn't sound right to me, but if I play an F there it does and since this is the only place a # shows up I wonder if maybe it could be written wrong, I doubt it but I had to ask.

Skip

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Thank you very much Steve, I've driven my wife nuts with "falling leaves" over the weekend. It's great to have another weapon in my arsenal (I now have two:crying2:), and as you said, it works as a really good exercise.

Again thanks:winkthumb:

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Steve, I have a question on the tab - on the second half, the fifth note over is a 4 on the D string, which is an F#, every time I attempt to play this half of the tune something doesn't sound right to me, but if I play an F there it does and since this is the only place a # shows up I wonder if maybe it could be written wrong, I doubt it but I had to ask.

Skip

Skip--

You are so right! A slip of the finger when making the tab. Looks like I'd better get GP5 for tabs! The updated one is loaded.

Steve

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wcostley, have another good look at the video, the F# fits perfectly.

Cheers, Skinny

Skinny,

I guess you were kidding me, I just looked again at the tab and the F# has been changed to an F.

When I was practicing the F# sounded fine, but right after it is a 5-2-3, it was the 2-3 that didn't sound right to me, I figured it was just me not hearing it right, but it continued to sound wrong no matter how many time I played it, so I finally noticed that the F# wasn't in the key of C, so that's when I sent Steve the inquiry.

Skip

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Skinny,

I guess you were kidding me, I just looked again at the tab and the F# has been changed to an F.

When I was practicing the F# sounded fine, but right after it is a 5-2-3, it was the 2-3 that didn't sound right to me, I figured it was just me not hearing it right, but it continued to sound wrong no matter how many time I played it, so I finally noticed that the F# wasn't in the key of C, so that's when I sent Steve the inquiry.

Skip

No Skip, I wasn't kidding, I think it's called ........."making a Dick of yourself in front of 38,000 members":oops: :oops:

I thought the F# sounded fine (There was a bottle of red involved). I really should get Planetalk, eh.

My apologies to yourself and Steve.

Skinny

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No Skip, I wasn't kidding, I think it's called ........."making a Dick of yourself in front of 38,000 members":oops: :oops:

I thought the F# sounded fine (There was a bottle of red involved). I really should get Planetalk, eh.

My apologies to yourself and Steve.

Skinny

Skinny--

Don't worry about it. I should be the one apologizing to the both of you. Mistakes happen. No worries! :yeahhh:

Steve

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Steve, (Solid Walnut)

Concerning the formula of 1 step back -1 step forward - 2 steps back - 2 steps forward.

I just can't seem to get my mind around how to understand that,

(probably has to do with my age) and I wouldn't bother you with it except that it's driving me nuts trying to understand it and I can't seem to let go of it, it's stuck in my brain.

What I see is that it starts out with 1 step forward and alternates from back to forward all the rest of the way through 2 octaves, that's all understand.

If you would attempt to clear the formula up for me it would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you,

Skip

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Steve, (Solid Walnut)

Concerning the formula of 1 step back -1 step forward - 2 steps back - 2 steps forward.

I just can't seem to get my mind around how to understand that,

(probably has to do with my age) and I wouldn't bother you with it except that it's driving me nuts trying to understand it and I can't seem to let go of it, it's stuck in my brain.

What I see is that it starts out with 1 step forward and alternates from back to forward all the rest of the way through 2 octaves, that's all understand.

If you would attempt to clear the formula up for me it would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you,

Skip

Skip, try not to think of the namesake of the move to understand it. The full name of it (add the step back and step forward inbetween each) would be 1, 2, 2, 2, 1, 2, 2, 1.

Let's see if this rings: If you ignore the last '1', which is just a repeat of the first move, take a look at what we have. S, T, T, T, S, T, T. These are the major scale intervals in reverse. A Semi-tone equals one step or one fret, a Tone equals two steps or two frets). Ok, forget the theory part of it for a minute.

Play the first half of the reverse C major scale on the high e string only (the first half of the Tab):

FallingLeavesTabBreakDown1.jpg

In the first half (8, 7, 5, 3), we have a S, T, T (to begin between 8 and 7, this is a semi-tone) . In the second half of the first part (6, 5, 3, 1) we have T, S, T, T (between the g note, or the 3rd fret of the e string, and the f note, or the 6th fret of the b string we begin with a T). Put this together and you have S, T, T, T, S, T, T, or a reverse major scale interval run.

Now notice in the second half of the tab you see the same notes on the same two strings, but in between are the addtional 'steps'. The steps in bold are the same as the scale on the left, and they are all the 'steps forward'. The non-bold notes are the 'steps back' or you could look at it this way, they are the 'pre-steps'. They precede the downbeat. Say 'and 1, and 2, and 3, and 4,' etc. The non-bold are the ands.

But one thing about all of the notes is that each one belongs to the C major scale.

The video just shows these same notes on different strings.

I hope this helps clear up some of this, Skip. Let me know.

Steve

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