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Guitar Tuner Calibration

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Hertz (Hz) is a measurement of how many times a recurring vibration occurs in the space of one second. Each of the 12 notes in Western music has a specific frequency. The 2nd string on a guitar is normally tuned to A where the recurring vibration occurs 440 times in a second. A = 440 Hz is known as concert pitch. The A note an octave up from this vibrates at 880 Hz and the A an octave down at 220 Hz.

If your A string is slightly sharp it will be just over 440 Hz and if flat it will be just under 440 hz.

Many people do tune strings (very) slightly flat or sharp as it is impossible to be in tune at every position on the fretboard so some strings can be tuned slightly above or below the specific frequency to produce the best compromise all over the fretboard.

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Actually, I think that A with 440Hz is the one on 1st string 5th fret... And 2nd string is tuned to B... 5th is A... :)

And this 440Hz tuning is known as concert pitch...

So, if you have any reason to be tuned slightly different then concert pitch, you calibrate the tuner and use it as always, it adjusts all the notes... I don't know what would be the practical use of this option, i.e. what could be the reason you'd want to be out of concert pitch... Anybody knows?

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if you have any reason to be tuned slightly different then concert pitch, you calibrate the tuner and use it as always, it adjusts all the notes... I don't know what would be the practical use of this option, i.e. what could be the reason you'd want to be out of concert pitch... Anybody knows?

Several I can think of:

1) You like heavy gauge strings, but you still want to bend them, so you tune down a semi-tone (the SRV option)

2) You used to be able to hit those high notes but now your voice is beginning to fail you, so you tune down half a tone rather than learn all the songs in a different key (the Ben_Sir_Amos option)

3) Your old wooden frame on your old piano won't take the tension of concert pitch

4) Your old recordings were not made with the benefit of digital tuners and you want to play along

And the naughtiest, from the days when we used tape recorders, tune down and play that solo with the tape running slow - then speed it all back up to concert pitch during the mix. Not that I ever cheated like that. Oh no.

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Several I can think of:

1) You like heavy gauge strings, but you still want to bend them, so you tune down a semi-tone (the SRV option)

2) You used to be able to hit those high notes but now your voice is beginning to fail you, so you tune down half a tone rather than learn all the songs in a different key (the Ben_Sir_Amos option)

I don't think this is related to calibrating the tuner... When you tune down a semitone you're still in 440Hz... I.e. your A is still 440Hz... You changed the tuning of your guitar, but you're still in concert pitch... OK? :)

3) Your old wooden frame on your old piano won't take the tension of concert pitch

I don't know about this... I don't have a piano... But something tells me you're still referring to tuning down a semitone... :)

4) Your old recordings were not made with the benefit of digital tuners and you want to play along

Actually, this could be the reason... Maybe somebody in 1920's played a couple of cents flat or sharp... I don't know if this is the real reason...

Sorry if I'm wrong about this, Ben... But I'm pretty sure you're wrong about the first two... I can't bet on the second two... And, I don't know why, but I have a feeling Fretsource knows the answer... :) Perhaps I'm wrong, 'cause usually he would say something so far...

All best

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Hi friends,

I just bought a shining black Fender acoustic guitar.

I also bought a Korg Electronic Tuner with it ...

I tuned the guitar to 440 Hz with the help of the

electronic tuner..

It seems to be too tight......and my G string snapped.

I have replaced the string.

Would this have caused any damage to the guitar ??

Also, is 440 Hz alright for an acoustic guitar ??

Please help.

--Sid

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Hi again Sid. Sounds like you are tuning the g string way too high. The best advice I can give is to use the tuner on the forum and tune each string by ear, then fine tune them using the Korg. I too have a Fender accoustic and, like all guitars it'll tune to concert pitch without a problem. I doubt that the string breaking will have caused any damage. Tony.:wheelchai

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Hi Eliot,

I did it with the online tuner

and then tuned it with the Korg one.

The string action is way too high.......and

my guitar has not got an adjustable bridge.....

Can the string action be lowered....Should I

take it to a pro ?

Thanks

--Sid.

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Hi Eliot,

I did it with the online tuner

and then tuned it with the Korg one.

The string action is way too high.......and

my guitar has not got an adjustable bridge.....

Can the string action be lowered....Should I

take it to a pro ?

Thanks

--Sid.

Hi Sid. The action on my Fender seemed too high but I fitted a set of Martin extra light strings, .10-.47. That was a huge improvement over the original heavy gauge. You can lower the action by cutting down the saddle but if yours is anything like mine it could be risky. Mine is tapered down from the 6th string and cut away for the 1st and 2nd, Try the guitar shop for a lower saddle or get one the same and try lowering it yourself before you do anything with the one on your guitar. If cost isn't a problem get a pro to do it, I doubt it would cost much, better that than making a costly mistake. Tony. :wheelchai

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Hi Tony,

Yes...thats what i think I should do..

Better take it to a guitar shop....

I guess it will be an everyday job for him...

Better than trying it out myself and causing

some serious damage......

:)

Thanks !!

--Sid.

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