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chorizo

Getting Key from drums

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Dewy    0

or the drummer could have a huge drum kit... with the drums marked white for whole tones, and black for half tones...

nahh, I think its a studio gimmick if anything...

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chorizo    0
That topic was part of my discussion with my drummer friend. He made the point that bands do songs in various keys and the drummer doesn't stop in between songs to tune his drums to match those keys, so the premise would only work for as many songs as they did in a given key...as soon as they performed a song in a different key, the premise would be invalid. In a studio environment I could see where they would have plenty of time to do it (if they were so inclined), but they'd certainly have a hard time replicating it in a live performance.

But what if a drum setup could lend itself to more than one key (like an individual note can) i.e be pitched so that may work as the I, IV, or V or other depending on the key chosen, that would allow for a whole range of songs in different keys without any change.

I'm not the best person to make a good case cos my theory isn't my strong point. But i just feel that some notes seem to work better when played against CERTAIN drum setups one of which is the setup used by John Bonham for that song and i don't think he needed any gimmicks. Other setups leave me clueless. I'm just speaking for me personally :).

But if no-one else here is experiencing the same then i will have to accept that its probably just a question of luck.

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chorizo    0

Here are some experpts from a drum players forum

"This doesn't mean, that the musical note of a drum is not important.

In a studio, sometimes the drum,s are tuned to specific notes. Drummers tune thier sets for a certain song to match the main key of it or certain toms to match the key of the part they are used in.

In a live situation this is impossible, but it will enhance the drum performance in recordings.

Regardless from if you like to tune to certain notes or not, it is good to keep an eye on the intervals between the drums. They can make a drumset sound thinner of more full bodied".

and

"i like my snare an octave above the hi tom, and the floor tom and octave below the hi tom. middle tom in between,, it works good for me".

and

"I have my 8x10 at A# (very high tuning), my 9x12 at F and my 14x14 somewhere around C. Snare is between both rack toms. Bass...dunno".

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Dewy    0

yes, even in complete ignorance of all I learned in this topic I understood that the drums should be tuned relative to each other. But I was under the impression it was up the drummer to decide the reference pitch.

What I think I have learned here is there is a "pitch" that works best for a drum dependent on its shell length and diameter. But this pitch does not correspond to a musical not... it is a percussive non musical pitch.

Which rolls back around to the old insult, " Would the musicians AND THE DRUMMER please report to the stage."

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