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AeroHudson

Electric Acoustic or Acoustic??

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AeroHudson    0

I am a guitar newb. I just starting playing on an old stratocaster loaned to me by a good friend on Tuesday of last week. After playing for a week, learning the 8 primary "cowboy" chords and spending about an hour at guitar center being in awe over the weekend I officially have the bug.

I am researching a future guitar purchase and want to spend from $200 to $300 on a guitar. From what I have read getting a solid top of some type should be a priority and I definitely want an acoustic guitar of some type. The question is should I by an electric acoustic or take the additional money it would take to get one and just get a better quality standard acoustic?

Any other suggestions on the brand of guitar would be helpful as well. My friend has a nice Takimine that is just gorgeous and I have seen some Fender, Ibanez and Ovatiob models that looks and sound pretty darn good.

Thanks in advance for the assistance!! :)

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allthumbs    8

I have a Washburn Folk that I am happy with but, there are so many reasonably priced electro-acoustics to choose from. Your best bet is to play as many as you can till you find one that feels and plays well in your hands.

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AeroHudson    0

Thanks for the feedback! The more I get into researching a guitar purchase the more I get the feeling I should invest the money in just a solid acoustic guitar and not the electronics in an EA version.

Can you give me some thoughts on the following guitar makers in the $200 to $300 price range?

- Fender

- Takamine

- Epiphone

- Ibanez

- Ovation

- Any other you can recommend??

Thanks again folks!!

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fly135    5

If you think that you may be recording yourself in the near future then I would suggest getting an acoustic/electric. The clarity and fullness of sound you get from plugging in direct will be more difficult to get miced until you get a good mic, stand, preamp/mixer and some experience setting it up.

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scott58    0

Look for one with an onboard tuner. I'll never be without that option again. Having said that, your budget will need to include alot more equipment with an acoustic/electric. Good amps aren't cheap, any effects will add to your costs etc etc. If $300 was the absolute max I could spend I'd probably go with a straight acoustic and i'd look used to get the most bang for my buck. Beware. buying a guitar becomes very addictive. In the last 6 months I've bought 3 guitars, 2 amps, modeler and just ordered a PA and don't think I'm done yet. Good luck.

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Dewy    0

Dean makes some very reasonably priced electric/acoustics in that price range with onboard electronics and tuners.

I have to question if you'll be able to detect the difference between a $300 acoustic without the electronics, and one with the electronics simply by ear or feel. So I would suggest getting the electronics built in... gives you more options down the road for the same buck.

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AeroHudson    0

Thanks everyone!

Another quick question...I mau have the opportunity to get a Takamine EG340SC for $299.99 which is normally $399.99. Is this a good buy I should jump on or should I still take the approach of sitting down and playing alot of models and then making my decision?

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fly135    5

Go to your local guitar stores and try out as many of the guitars as you can. Take a friend that has some experience if possible.

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AeroHudson    0

I have a friend that is a very good guitar player and we are planning on heading down to the local Guitar Center on Wednesday for a couple of hours so I can try out a couple and then see how they are really supposed to sound from him. I'm looking forward to it!

What I am hearing is to not get dead set on a model and just try out a bunch within the price range based on my requirements and go with the one that feels and sounds the best to me with of course some guidance and assistance from my friend.

Sounds like a solid plan to me.

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kbow    0

I have recently purchased an acoustic electric classical guitar by Takamine and could not be happier. I play fingerstyle and this baby is sweet. Built in tuner and eq.

Musician's Friend is where I got it. My third guitar to purchase from them and am very pleased.

take care.

kbow

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AeroHudson    0

I'm full of questions today!! :)

Another quick one...is it harder to learn how to play on a regular electric guitar vs. an acoustic model? I ask because I am learning on my friend's strat which has a 1 5/8" nut width while most Dreadnought guitars have a 1 11/16" nut width. I know it is only a sixteenth of an inch difference but I figured I would ask.

Also, now that I know what high action refers to, is a strat considered to be high action or low action? Will this make a difference in how smoothly I learn to play?

Thanks again everyone!! :smilinguitar:

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Dewy    0

Too many variables in your sound with an electric in my humble opinion. Acoustic lets you focus on the playing of the guitar, while a great portion of dealing with an Electric guitar is jumping through "hoops" to get a certain sound.

Get an acoustic...

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fly135    5

Acoustics and electrics are so different that you'll probably want (at least) one of each. The electric will be easier to fret. But IMO the acoustic will be easier to finger pick, more forgiving of mistakes, and you won't be tethered to an amp.

As Dewy suggested with the acoustic you'll just belt out the notes or chords and listen to them ring. With the electric you'll be twiddling with knobs on your amp trying to get it to sound better.

In the end it depends on what are your personal goals. If you want to play metal or guitar solos with bends then you'll need an electric. If you mainly want to strum chords and sing, or fingerpick then get an acoustic.

If you want to do everything then get both. My advice is get a decent acoustic, then pick up somebody's cheap Squire Strat/Practice amp that they are dumping on Craigslist because they didn't learn to play. You can make a easy playing good sounding guitar out of a cheap electric. But that can be difficult with a cheap acoustic.

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AeroHudson    0

Thanks Fly! I am definitely more of the acoustic vibe kind of guy at the present time so your and other's advice is perfect for the type of music I want to play and gravitate to. Not to say that I may not be interested in an electric later on if / when I get any good.

Sounds like I need to keep saving a bit of money of the next couple of weeks and make several trips to the guitar store to pick out an instrument.

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try this little trick to help you in your choices.

get several of the guitars in your price range and have your buddy play them for you with your back turned.

mix a few less expensive ones in and a few higher priced models.

you may be surprised.

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Lcjones    8

.... Yet another Kentucky quarters worth ....

Acoustic guitars were not meant to be "electrified". When an acoustic guitar is designed and built, it is the tonal qualities of the wood that creates the magnificent tones you hear. Each detraction from the wood causes the acoustics to change.

When a switch-block mounting hole is cut and a switch mounted into the body side of an acoustic guitar the sound is completely different from the original virgin wood tones generated. You now have electrical wiring, a battery retainer, if it is an active switch, a hole in the wood, plus the sonics of the plastic switch itself altering the tone of the guitar.

Nearly every acoustic/electro guitar I have encountered creates a "tinny" tone as opposed to the "rich" tone of a natural acoustic guitar.

You can easily mic up an acoustic to give you the "true" sound of an amplified acoustic guitar. As well, you can add active or passive pickups to an acoustic guitar for your amplification needs, yet still retain that wholesome acoustic sound for those intimate moments.

With that in mind, I highly recommend a straight acoustic guitar. In the future, when you are looking for additional tones to round out your guitar tone catalog, you can start looking at high-end acoustic/electro models. Emphasis on high end.

**

LC

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AeroHudson    0

Great feedback! Thanks! Some other quick thoughts...I thought I was sold on a cut away so the guitar will "grow" with me just in case I want to and have the skill to do solo stuff on the lower frets. Knowing that I am a newb and this is my first guitar should I not be that concerned with whether it is a cut away or not. I ask because I notice that the cut aways are a bit more expensive.

Thanks again everyone!

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Lcjones    8

I may raise the ire of others, however, I'd hedge away from cut-aways.

My premise is KISS. Keep it simple, ad infinitum. You can do a life times worth of solo work without a cut-away. I.E., Doc Watson to name one of the all time greatest non cut-away acoustic guitarists in the world.

A cut-away, while obviously having advantages in one degree, does not mean you can solo any better. It allows you to reach those upper frets, 14,15, 17.... but realistically, how often do you think you'll be there?

And that's just me ..... My opines are just that. Opinions. It's in your hands as you know what you want.

Eyes open. The money is in the first five frets. ;)

**

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Aunt Doty    0

I have a Takamine E series auditorium style. I was planning on buying a Dean like my friend's but once I picked up and strummed the "T" nothing else sounded good!!!!!!!! It has a deep mellow sound, not brassy at all! It is electric acoustic and has an onboard tuner. List price was $499 but I got it for $299. My instructor took me and sends a lot of people there so we get good discounts. I did look at musicianfriends site tho and the prices looked good. Check out their prices even if you go play at the local store because you may get a much better deal!! Good luck!!!

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AeroHudson    0

Great advice from everyone! I really appreciate all of the comments and thoughts. This has definitely expanded the guitars I will consider as I will now be selecting from standard dreadnoughts, cut aways, acoustics, electric acoustics and the whole shooting match.

I think what I have drawn from this thread is to not rule anything out. The perfect guitar for me could be any of the ones we discussed. I will just need to get out there and start playing them and bring my friend along to keep me honest.

Thanks again everyone!!

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Stratrat    0

AeroHudson, I think you're on the right track. One can end up with a very good guitar by picking it from a catalog/website using specs and user reviews....but none of that will tell you what it actually feels like to hold it, or how it will sound to your ear ("tone" is a highly subjective concept!). Going out and playing as many guitars as possible is a much better way to find it - that way you'll end up going home not just with the one that looks good "on paper", but the one that feels and sounds best to you!

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D-Dawn    0

Get what sounds the best to you..try them all! I have a Takamine

EG530SC that I rarely touch. I thought I liked it when I first bought it, lol but I hate to play it. Its a dust collector or I let the kids band on it.

I played a Taylor (never thought I'd do that) the other day and I am still drooling..OMG this thing felt like butta!

Anyway...as you grow in your playing, your ear will change. Don't spend a mint right away, but don't buy crap either! My .02 :D

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AeroHudson    0

Well, I got a chance to go back to guitar center today without the kids, hardly anyone in the store and no salesmen bugging me. I must have played at least 15 different guitars in my price range.

I played some electric acoustics from Epiphone, Takamine, Fender, Ibanez and others. I also played some straight acoustics from the same folks. The one that sounded the best and felt the best to me I thought was kind of odd...

http://www.guitarcenter.com/shop/product/buy_takamine_gs330s_acoustic_guitar?full_sku=100461893

There was a huge difference in the sound quality of this one compared to equitable brands. Heck, it sounded better than some $700 Takamine electric acoustics. This one wasn't fancy just solid. No intricate inlays, no fancy paterns on the body of the guitar, no cut aways, it just sounded like a superior instrument.

If I had to choose right now this one would be it hand down. I compared it with an equitable Ibanez acoustic and it murdered it hands down. The Ibanez just could not belt out the rich sound that the Takamine had.

Everyone was right...you just don't know until you go in and try them out. I plan on going back with my guitar playing friend tomorrow night to get his take.

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